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November 7, 2020 9:58 pm  #1


Weather: What is "Indian Summer"?

Info below taken from this link:

https://www.almanac.com/content/indian-summer-what-why-and-when

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"We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:"

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky; sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze; daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

https://www.almanac.com/sites/default/files/users/AlmanacStaffArchive/autumn-2444046_1920_full_width.jpg
Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.


A government which robs Peter to
pay Paul can always depend on
the support of Paul.
-- George Bernard Shaw
 

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